Why corporate event data matters & how it moves the market.

Spotlight on ETF Splits

As we wind down from earnings season, in addition to monitoring earnings-related events, there are many corporate events to keep a close watch on such as dividends that can affect volatility.

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The Power of Corporate Event Clusters

A look at Disney’s superhero stock increase Observing information pre-event, during the event and post-event closely in relationship to one another is critical to understand how it could impact your trading and risk

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Shareholder Season: What the Uptick in Meetings Means for Your Trading Strategies

As we head into prime season for shareholder meetings, investors are taking notice that the number of meetings conducted by publicly traded companies is on the rise. Corporate events like shareholder meetings and changes to those events can cause volatility, which makes accurate and timely knowledge of events extremely important for investors. By keeping track of movement around shareholder meetings alongside other events such as earnings releases, traders can adjust their trading strategies as needed.

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How Fund Managers Can Best Use Alt Data

Alternative data can take on different meanings to investors so let’s start with a general definition: “alt” data refers to non-traditional or unique information not previously known or available to financial markets. 

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Virtual Shareholder Meetings:  The New Normal

While we have seen a dramatic rise of virtual shareholder meetings over the past few years, there has also been an increase of in-person attendance at investor conferences putting the competing ‘virtual vs. human’ views at odds. We take a closer look, below.

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IROs Widen What’s on Their Radar with Corporate Event Intelligence

An IRO’s job is to provide bi-directional visibility. They give their management teams visibility into what the financial community thinks about how their companies are being run both individually and as compared to others in their sectors. Ultimately it is those perceptions that affect their stock prices. Conversely, the IRO has groups to service – shareholders, analysts and other financial constituents – for whom they provide visibility into their companies’ strategies, operations and performance.

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